So, you’re graduating with a biology or environmental science or marine bio degree! Hurray! You’ve finished your stint at college, and you’ve gained a lot of new skills. Maybe you’ve done some time in research, maybe not (!!!), but now that you’ve wrapped up, you want to find a job in the environmental sciences. Something that will give you research experience, and help you on your way to either a career or deciding whether you want to go into research.

OK, where do you go now?

Here are some compiled resources. Feel free to contact us with more.

General

  • Sign up for the Ecological Society of America’s mailing list. Lots of opportunities flow through there.
  • The ESA Phys Ecology job board has a ton of jobs, and for far more than just physiological ecology work. Check out their staff and seasonal positions.
  • The same group also provides a great list of job boards worth checking out. Start there, and go down the rabbit hole of the wide array of positions available, although some are for more senior folk.
  • Birder? Check out the extensive listing at the Ornithological societies of North America job page.
  • To start to get into government research, see the USGS jobs page. Many of the listings are for research internships as well as government positions.
  • Texas A&M Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences provides a wonderful job and internship listing for positions around the world
  • One way to get into field work is to, well, work at a field station! The Organization of Biological Field Stations provides a listing of current positions.
  • One way many recent grads get involved in more management and conservation is with jobs and internships at the Student Conservation Association.
  • The American Society of Limnology and Oceanography maintains a job board that is a mix of tech-level positions and upper level positions. So, some filtering required
  • Environmental Career Opportunities posts a wide variety of job types.
  • For the more geography inclined, see The Society for Conservation GIS.
  • If you’re interested in education, museums, and wildlife, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums has a wide variety of opportunities.
  • And last, for a ton of additional information for postgrad and beyond, Marissa Baskett maintains a superb website. It’s a bit beyond the scope of what we’re talking about here, and just academia focused, but it provides a great jumping off point.

Within Massachusetts and New England